Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook is Dead for Brands, Now What?

Facebook deadIn the summer, Facebook reduced the organic reach of brand’s posts to less than 2% of the brand’s likes. With dismissal results like this, why are brands continuing to have a social strategy that includes Facebook?

According to a Facebook spokesperson, “We’re getting to a place where because more people are sharing more things, the best way to get your stuff seen if you’re a business is to pay for it.”

Fast forward to the present and Facebook is reporting record growth. The company earned $2.96 billion in ad revenue in the third quarter, up 64 percent from just a year ago. So yeah, Facebook is not dead. It is just dead as a social sharing option for brands. For brands, Facebook is nothing more than another mass audience platform to deliver advertisements. Smart companies no longer use paid Facebook to produce blatant sales ads. They create paid stories on Facebook to adapt to users’ behavior. So yes, Facebook is a good platform for targeted paid media. But what should brands do to build relationships and grow their target audience organically?

A good two years ago plus, I suggested that “… Facebook May Not Be Your Brand’s Community” over two years ago. While Facebook has changed much in the past couple of years, my premise has stayed the same. And now it is punctuated more than every.

When it comes to Facebook (or any other platform) you must remember – You do not own it. You never owned the complete data set of your likes and that should have been a yellow flag all along. Facebook has changed its rules of engagement for brands more than any other social platform, but you can expect other platforms to follow course. If you want to manage your own social strategy without having your strings pulled, think about embedding your community on your own site.

The first response I get when I tell (non-strategic) people this is, “But Facebook has a gazillion users that I need to leverage. I could never get as many ‘likes’ on my own community.” And you know what … they are correct. You could never get as many followers on your own community. But your own community can still yield great results.

First off, of all the likes you have converted on Facebook, an overwhelming majority of them never really followed you to begin with. Most of them were enticed by some promotion and then never paid attention to you after that. And now with a practically non-existent organic reach, just about no one sees your post anyway.

The second reality is that if someone opts in to be a community member on your own site, they really are interested in your brand. Yes the number of onsite community members will likely be significantly smaller than the number of Facebook likes. But the community members are true brand loyalist (assuming you give them compelling information, stories, and promotions as a community member). Would it not be great if you had 500 community members and 100 of them were true advocates spreading the word about your brand? What is the value of having 100 objective people sharing your brand, marketing your brand to their friends and family?

Early this year, I gave you pointers on “Successful Social Marketing Integrating Content and Community.” In another article I told you ”Why Your Budget Must Include Website Re-investment.” Consider these two strategies going forward. Make sure the digital assets you own are most valuable and compelling to your audience. Build a marketing strategy based upon the capture and conversion of your target audience on YOUR OWNED digital assets. Then use other social platforms and channels to drive traffic to your digital asset.

In summary, let me ask you a rhetorical question … where do you think you can best monetize your target audience … on your digital asset or one owned by the other person?

Make It Happen,
Social Steve

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Here is the Deal with Facebook

FB

This past week I moderated a panel at The Social Engagement Summit put on by InsightPool. While sitting in the audience listening to some of the other discussions and presentation, I found many had a distinct hate for Facebook.

You see, as I reported previously Facebook’s delivery (also called organic reach) of brand content to users’ newsfeed has diminished to almost nothing. You have to pay to play or put another way… pay for posts to be delivered to your target audience.

This really has disenchanted numerous social marketers that have invested so much in building up their Facebook following. Facebook was social marketers’ primary social media channel. Facebook was synonymous with the term social media for so long, but now organic social marketers are fed up. I also heard someone on a panel that is responsible for B2B marketing saying they were through with Facebook.

My answer to all … WAKE UP. First off, Facebook was never a good platform for B2B marketing. Look at how people use Facebook. What percentage of them really used Facebook for work scenarios? Wasn’t just about everyone using Facebook to break away from his or her work life? Second of all, did you really expect the joy ride from Facebook… for them to simply provide you a conduit to an audience at no charge? Facebook is a public company where investors expect a strong revenue flow and increased profitability each and every month.

The first mistake has been putting all your cookies in someone else’s jar and expecting them to let you eat for free while they hold your assets. You must play on many platforms driven by a) guidance from your target audience’s digital behavior use, and b) a recognition that YOU need to own the data on your customers and you must build an integrated strategy to acquire that information.

I really do not blame Facebook and have no bitterness to them as so many do. They have built a massive user base and it is time for them to monetize it to the max. Do you really think TV stations back in the fifties just wanted to entertain you or were their profit plans behind their objectives? Facebook has turned into the advertorial equivalent of TV (before the cable companies came along). They built up a user base and are not looking for viewers to pay, but rather have “sponsors” pay to reach an audience. And when it comes to paid media, no other platform gives you such highly targeted delivery at such an affordable cost.

cost of FB adsSource

I do think Facebook is a very important platform for paid media, but no longer that important for following and posting. Use other platforms (including your own community or your own site) to distribute owned (or unpaid) media. Consider my suggestions on the integration of owned, earned, and paid media.

Everyone wants to hate Facebook for the wrong reasons. It is the way I remember Microsoft in the late 80s when they changed their operating system from DOS to Windows. They were going after a larger audience (and copying Apple) looking to monetize greater revenue and profitability. Everyone wants to hate the big company – especially when they change. If you don’t like Facebook, don’t use it. But it is still a very marketing-smart platform for reaching your target audience. It is just that user behavior and platform rules have changed. And if you don’t expect or have the adaptability for change, you shouldn’t be a digital marketer.

Make It Happen,
Social Steve

PS – Call me bold or stupid … next week I take on John Oliver and answer the question, What’s the Deal with Native Advertising?

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Time to Rethink Social Media

As I shared with you a couple of weeks ago (and many others have covered) Facebook is changing the way it treats brand’s posts and their distribution (or lack thereof).

rethink socil media

Should anyone really be surprised? Does it not make sense to monetize the accomplishment of being the number one social network? Sure, you can get ticked off, but can you really blame Facebook.

And you know what … you should take some blame yourself. Does it really make sense to put the control and success in the hands of another platform? What has kept you from putting control and destiny in your own hands?

So if you agree that you need to keep control and manage your own destiny, this means that you, the brand, need to have your own platform. Here is what I mean by this …

Every brand should have its own “home court.” This means that brands should have a content repository where all their content is housed. This content repository should sit on the brand’s website. Often the content repository takes the form of a blog. Brands should not place their content on a platform that someone else controls. You should control this platform.

Now this does not mean that I think brands should not use social media, but the social channels should be used to proliferate content. Social media should also be used as an extended channel for brand engagement with their target audience. A brand should put together a content strategy for the owned digital asset (their website) and then think about using social media channels to distribute abstracts of the content such that digital traffic is driven to a platform they control.

When a brand builds success driving traffic to their website, the next step is to think about building a community there. About two years ago, I indicated “Why Facebook May Not Be Your Brand’s Community.” Now some may say, why should I bother to build a community? Why would anyone come to my community when there is Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and others? Can I really get a crowd developed? Well, think about this. If you truly deliver content that is interesting, entertaining, and/or compelling, you will capture a crowd. And if you are worried about the size of your community, simply look at each individual as a potential ambassador of your brand spreading your content and brand value. Give them a reason why they would want to join your community. Even if you had a handful of ambassadors, that is a major accomplishment. Earlier this year, I provided a play book describing “Successful Social Marketing – Integrating Content and Community.”

I am certain there are some that will say they don’t have the resource or budget to do what I am suggesting. Heck, I’ve heard it from the companies I have worked for and clients I provide strategy and plans to. My answer to this is simply … if you truly care about your customers and potential customers you will find the budget. I say this not because this is the business I am in, but rather because the audience behavior demands it. I am a marketer first and foremost. I got into digital and social media because I followed the audience behavior.

And now new Facebook procedures demand change. Change that I recommended even a couple years back. Change that demands you keeping up and adapting your marketing skill set.

And needless to say, other social platforms will change. So here is the question … are you going to stay stagnant with your digital, social, and overall marketing? Or as the title suggests, isn’t it “Time to Rethink Social Media” and your whole digital approach. Audience behavior, technology, and platform operations demand you be adaptable. Don’t get comfortable. Put your seatbelt on and drive the course to success. If you expect a straight road you are fooling yourself.

Make It Happen,
Social Steve

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Changes in Facebook Signal a Need for Social Marketing Change

Just when you thought you were getting the hang of capturing your audience’s awareness, consideration, loyalty, and advocacy via social marketing, the social world pivots. The new twist will require a change in your social strategy.

facebook changes

First, lets define the change. For the past couple of weeks there have been leaks that Facebook intends to drop the organic reach of brands to 1-2%. This means that if you have 200K fans on Facebook, roughly only 3K fans will see any given post. Is this what you worked so hard to build up your Facebook fan base for? Of course you can pay Facebook to amplify your posts. That is really not a bad idea as costs are reasonable (today), but it certainly is not something you are going to do for every post.

Many brands have witnessed a continuous decline of organic reach on Facebook. (Have you checked your numbers recently?) Facebook should no longer be viewed as simply a content-driven and engagement platform to win over the target audience. Content plus engagement and now paid amplification for content are required to get postings on newsfeeds of “brand-likers.” Facebook should now be viewed as a promotional platform. Daily posts no longer make sense.

So what do you about this now? Consider doing a Facebook “dark post” to a targeted audience that is not necessarily your fans. Do these promotions only when you truly have something news-worthy (new product release, special event) and not every day content. Think about having your own content repository for daily posts and then using a plethora of social channels to proliferate that content and drive traffic to your site (where your content repository resides).

What really drives me crazy is that Facebook states that the shrinking of organic reach is not to force brands to pay for Facebook use. Facebook suggests that there is a strong increase in content production from brands that has created a flood of spam marketing on Facebook. If revenue is not the reason for this sudden drastic change, why not allow users to “opt-in” the brands they want to see in their newsfeed. Why not just give the complete control to the users. That will eliminate spam. If users have the power to manage their own newsfeed, their actions translate to simply say, “make it worth my while and I will let you get into my newsfeed.”

Anyway, I am not holding my breath that this is going to happen. In fact I would say Facebook actions will set a precedent for other social platforms. Once a given social platform has built up a large enough user base, they will then turn to brands and say “pay to play.”

All this said, social marketing is still imperative to business. I’ll leave you today with two goals you should set that will yield very strong measurable results.

First, you do want your brand content and stories (not advertisements) to be consumed by your target audience. You want to win them over emotionally by delivering content that is valuable to them. You should no longer have a “social content strategy”, but rather a “brand content strategy.” Your brand content strategy should focus on the production of articles, photos, videos, and vines that have strong appeal to your audience. You should house these content pieces in a content repository that sits on your own site. Drive traffic to YOUR site, not someone else’s platform. Use social media channels to proliferate the content and engage with users where they are social.

The second piece of information (and maybe the most important) is to remember that there is nothing more powerful for marketing of a brand than advocacy. Having an objective person tell their friends, family, and colleagues that a brand is worthy of looking into is the greatest result a marketer can drive. Consider how you will motivate users to talk about your brand to other users on social channels. Do not worry about your brand being the “poster” of your brand story. There is much greater power putting these stories in the hands of advocates to disseminate. Your marketing strategy MUST address a plan for capturing and unleashing brand advocates on their social profiles and channels.

So social marketing is as important as ever. As always, you just need to stay on top of changing dynamics of social platforms and user behaviors. And then folks you are ready to …

Make It Happen,
Social Steve

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Delivering the Content Your Audience Wants

When it comes to social marketing, there is only one response to the question, “what is the content your brand delivers to its audience?” The answer must be “the content they want.” Social marketing is not about delivering a marketing communication to push content on your audience.

And the second mistake most make in social marketing is thinking that their job is done when they acquire a high number of likes, followers, or fans. I like the way Nate Elliot puts it in his June, 2012 report “The ROI of Social Marketing” – “Fans have little innate value; it is what brands do with their followers – not merely that they have them – that creates value.” And this means delivering consistent value to those fans on their terms.

Lets talk about this through a case study of a leading consumer brand I recently looked at as an off-shot of some work I was doing. (Let’s just call them Brand-X)

Brand content reach and engagement

From the figure above, you are likely to think that the brand is performing well using Facebook to deliver content and capture strong reach and engagement. But when we look into real execution, things are not as pretty as they seem. First off, look at the peaks. While 500K people talking about this seems impressive it is less than 2% of the 27 million likes. It is also worth noting that the new product and service spikes came with paid sponsored posts. The content the audience reacted to most were celebrity video posts and a contest, and still, these posts reach less than 2% of the fans captured (which were likely via paid Facebook as well).

Once again, Nate Elliot expressed some interesting information. This month, the Ogilvy agency released data showing that the brand pages they manage reach just 6% of fans. For pages with more than 500,000 fans, Ogilvy says reach stands at just 2%.
Some have realized this for a bit, but were apprehensive to come out and say anything against the social media behemoth. Brands and agencies are now openly talking about their discontent. More and more brands are disillusioned with Facebook and are now placing their bets on other social sites — but few of them want to go on the record. In addition to poor Facebook measured results some see the biggest problem with Facebook is their constant rule changes.
But do not think for one second this does not mean that there is not a great value to brand social marketing. And I am not totally knocking Facebook either. But here are some points.

1) Facebook is extremely powerful when users (as opposed to brands) share the value of a product or service. Marketers may not need to focus on content distribution to Facebook, but certainly look to motivate their audience to share in all social channels.
2) Content marketing is extremely valuable. Brands need to get their marketing departments to evolve from traditional marketing communications to storytelling communication.
3) Compelling pictures and videos win audiences.
4) Think about numerous channels where content can be delivered to your users. (For example, I just did some research on a particular target audience for a brand and found out the targets were most active on Google+ and LinkedIn.)

When push comes to shove, pushing and shoving does not work in social media. Deliver compelling content YOUR AUDIENCE wants in the places that are likely to turn the best results. Think about having your own media repository and using social channels to distribute that content. Have others share it on social channels and be the place for conversations and engagement.

Make It Happen,
Social Steve

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After 10 Years of Facebook, 10 Things You Should Know About Social Marketing

10 yearsThis past week, Facebook turned 10 years old. While a handful of social networks came before Facebook, and many followed, Facebook was synonymous with social media for quite a while. For some time when people said social media they meant Facebook. Yes, there have always been other active social networks.

Facebook (and other social platforms) have dramatically changed our culture … the way we communicate and engage with others. And ten years later so many brands and companies still stumble using social media to win customers over. Far too many marketers bring an advertorial mentality to social marketing. The reality is that a majority of social users are turned off by brands’ advertorial interruption on social channels.

So as Facebook turns 10, marketers must be aware of the unofficial rules. These unofficial rules are driven by audience behavior first and foremost, and a desire to increase sales and profitability second.

1) Meaningless followers and likes – followers, likes, etc. are meaningless in and of themselves. If your audience doesn’t engage with you, and you with them, the audience never sees your posts anyway.

2) Followers and likes are just the beginning – the initial actions to get followers or likes is only the start. Yes, you could run a sweepstake and give away an iPad to everyone that likes your brand and get 1 million followers. But what good is that if it is the last action a person takes with your brand.

3) Relations are key – brand relationships are key to social success. You want to build an emotional bond with your target audience by showing them you care, delivering useful and/or entertaining information, and responding to mentions of your brand.

4) Avoid advertorial content – social users are turned by advertorial like content in their social feeds. Social media channels are not another acceptable place for content and postings, which are solely product push.

5) Avoid the hard sell – social media is not a good channel for direct sales. Typically, last click conversion does not happen on social media. Social media is an excellent marketing channel to gain attention and influence brand preference.

6) Measure – social marketing must be measured appropriately. Sales are not an appropriate measure of social marketing efforts, but rather the behaviors that tee up sales should be measured. Specifically – awareness, consideration, loyalty, and advocacy. (See “Know What Successful Social Media Looks Like.”)

7) Social starts off your home court – do not build the “field of dreams” social presence and expect everyone to show up there. Go out in existing forums, groups, communities, etc. that you do not own where the conversation already exists. Engage there. Build a reputation as a valuable source. Slowly move people to your social properties once you have established some degree of positive reputation.

8) Don’t confuse Facebook as your community – platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc. are NOT your brand community. You do not own the database of information of your audience on these platforms. Consider these platforms as a stepping-stone to attract people and gain affinity for your content hub and/or community you truly own. (See “Why Facebook may not be Your Brand’s Community.”)

9) Social is not a silo … typically social media responsibilities reside in the marketing department. In the words of David Packard (formerly of HP), “Marketing is far too important to be left to the marketing department.” Social leadership may come from the marketing department, but the social practice should be executed by the whole company. Have a plan to unleash company brand ambassadors. Establish policies that govern who speaks on brand social channels and how other employees can positively promote the brand on their personal channels. Motivate the whole company to participate.

10) Integration is key – integration of social marketing with other offline, traditional, direct, advertorial, and online marketing is imperative. Create synergy across all your marketing efforts.

As I hit my seventh year in social marketing I see one problem continuously standing in the way of success. That is most companies (and their leaders) continue to be myopic and internally focused. If there is one thing that social media has culturally changed that marketers must be sensitive to, it is that people who show continuous concern for their audience and “friends” get rewarded. Social user behavior dictates this. Give it some thought.

Make It Happen!
Social Steve

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A Facebook Page Every Marketer Should Learn From

This past week my son turned me on to an awesome Facebook page – Humans of New York … maybe the best Facebook page I have seen.

Before I share with you why this page is so great and what you should learn from it, let’s quickly review some Facebook fundamentals. Most people focus solely on Facebook “likes.” Likes by itself is not telling. You need to look at the “talking about this” parameter in conjunction with “likes.” Facebook defines “talking about this” as

the number of unique users who have created a “story” about a page in a seven-day period. On Facebook, stories are items that display in News Feed. Users create stories when they:

• like a page
• post on the page wall
• like a post
• comment on a post
• share a post
• answer a question
• RSVP to a page’s event
• mention the page in a post
• tag the page in a photo
• check in at a place
• share a check-in deal
• like a check-in deal
• write a recommendation
• claim an offer

The reason why “talking about this” is so important is that it basically defines how many Facebook users see the brand’s posts on their newsfeed. Thus, I always emphasize that the percentage of likes relative to the number of talking about this is the Facebook metric you need to look at.

HONY FB1

Now, back to Humans of New York. To start, look at the number of likes and number of talking about this. 1.5 million likes and 600K talking about this. 40 percent of the “likes” are “talking about this.” I have never seen this high of a percentage. As a comparison, entertainers run about 20 percent and commercial brands run about 1 to 2 percent.

HONY FB2

The magic of Humans of New York is pretty simple … great photographs and great human interest stories. So while Humans of New York is not a commercial brand, I still believe that marketers can learn much from their approach. Marketers – understand their content strategy. Pictures and human stories are most compelling to digital and social audiences. Find a way to humanize your brand. Feature the people behind the brand, the company team. Highlight the loyalists and the people that support your brand. Open your digital channels to UGC (user generated content). Brands’ Facebook presence must be more about people and stories than product push.

I do realize that Humans of New York is not a commercial brand where their success is measured by units sold. Granted, they have the luxury of posting whatever they want without concern for sales. But brands must have this mentality on their social channels as well. Let me put it this way … Marketers, don’t you want your posts to make it to your likes newsfeed? Don’t you want your audience to love your posts and engage? Don’t you want your brand to stay top of mind?

Make It Happen,
SocialSteve

Footnote … While I am an experienced marketer that stays current on new and trending digital environments, it was my son that alerted me to Humans of New York. I constantly talk to my kids about their digital and social experiences and preferences. Even if you are an experienced marketer executing you need to learn from the people shaping the current and future behavior of digital usage.

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